Artist vs. Scientist

Are the marketing roles evolving or are they merging?

This week I saw an intriguing infographic comparing the role of Marketing Artist versus Marketing Scientist. I found it interesting because I have always considering marketing more of an artistic service. Yet, the way technology is emerging and transforming marketing and advertising one could argue that the marketing function is taking on more of a scientific role. After all, marketing journals and blogs promote such topics as big data, analytics, metrics, tracking, and return on investment. In the past, these terms were not normally discussed in the confines of marketing; but, now they are part of the lingo.

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Salesforce advocates that these two roles as separate and distinct. One focused on creativity and innovation (The Artist) and the other in data and analytics (The Scientist). Each persona has specific tools, techniques, tips, and strategies that they use to be successful. Modern marketing departments will successfully blend these two roles together.

In the context of artists and scientist, Jim Sterne defines the roles in terms of data. A data scientist is responsible for understanding and advancing the nature of data, its collection methods, and the algorithms for processing it. An artist is responsible for creating something new that delivers original insight and evokes emotion. A data artist must have a firm comprehension of hard science, a sound understanding of business goals and processes, a penchant for creativity, and a talent for communication – a very rare combination. A data artist must be a master of all digital media –ad networks, email campaigns, YouTube channel measurement and more – to create valid insights worthy of using as foundations for business decisions. I like that!

Marketers are challenged with old legacy systems and non-integrated data. Resources (scientist or artist) spend a significant amount of time analyzing what happened yesterday. They are running to catch up or get ahead of competitors. Even worse, those that work with “results” spend more time creating and distributing reports than truly analyzing. The insight is in the analysis, not the reports themselves. More resources are needed to explore the data and then let that inspire them. Imagine the possibilities!

So where’s this all going? I believe there is a huge shift toward more technology in marketing (see my previous blog), but how does the modern marketer truly blend the scientist and the artist?

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Bring-Your-Own-Device (BYOD) to Work

The impact of consumerization of technology

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Do you bring your own device to work, such as a tablet or smart phone? If so, does your employer allow you to use it for work or personal activities?

It used to be that technology was confined to either the work or home environment. Now, devices are portable, affordable, and flexible enough that they go everywhere with us, including the office. Moreover, users are actually using their personal devices to perform work activities. The “consumerization of IT” is defined as the use of technologies that can easily be provisioned by non-technologists. This trend represents a fundamental shift between employers and employees.

But, what’s the impact? Gartner found 40% used personally owned smartphones, tablets, laptops or desktops as a primary or supplemental business device and 45% of workers not required to use a personal device for work were doing so without their employer’s knowledge. Most users do not require traditional IT resources to connect, collaborate, share, or consume content. Employees demand to use their personally preferred mobile devices, personal computers, applications, social media, and cloud services wherever they go or in whatever they do. Technology has made employee empowerment easier, but not all organizations are embracing it. In fact, some organizations attempt to control it with strict policies or specific hardware and software requirements or company issued devices.

Is there a happy medium? Employers are concerned about everything affecting their brand – this incudes security, software viruses, viral content, breaches, etc. Employees believe they can and should be able to use their own devices to be more productive and stay in touch with the outside world. Both sides should work together to find common ground. CIOs must forge new, collaborative relationships with users, give them freedom to make IT decisions, and teach them how to assume responsibility for those decisions.

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Mirror, Mirror on the Wall…Help Me Out!

How Technology May Change The Dressing Room Experience

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In the story of Snow White, the magic mirror held great power. Oh, to have a mirror like that on a shopping trip!

I don’t know about you, but I have to psych myself up when shopping for clothes. I despise trips to the dressing room, especially if I end up shopping at more than one store. The process of undressing, trying on clothes, and then redressing is maddening! Because of this, I tend to overload my trip to the dressing room with different sizes and color options. Nearly all of us can relate to being situations where you love the style or color of an item, but the size wasn’t quite right. Yet, unless you have a friend or family member that can fetch another one, who wants to get redressed to go back out onto the sales floor only to have to go through the undress/try on/redress process. Get the picture?

But, there are some cool technology advancements just around the corner that may make the trip to the dressing room less painful and…fun!

Nordstrom is testing smart mirrors in the dressing room that have the ability to act as a website. With the tap of a customer’s finger, the mirror turns into an interactive screen, effectively creating smart fitting rooms. The intent is to bring technology into an area (the dressing room) that is normally not automated, but highly influences the consumer’s buying decision. Additionally, Bloomingdale’s is adding mounted iPads on the wall of their dressing rooms. Bloomingdale’s solution is not quite as sophisticated or high-tech as interactive mirrors, but it’s a step in the right direction. With this technology, customers can scan bar codes to find colors or sizes and to see what’s in stock. Additionally, they can request an associate bring an item to them without having to leave the dressing room.

How about not even having to get undressed at all to try on clothes? Yes, it maybe possible. Emerging retail technology is considering how holograms can play into the dressing room experience. British digital agency Engage created a Virtual Style Pod that scanned shoppers and created a life-size image onto which luxury clothing from brands like Alexander McQueen and DKNY were projected. Now, that’s pretty cool stuff!

But, this technology is not just about making the shopping experience more pleasant for the customer. Retailers are learning how to use their brick and mortar stores to service customers like never before. As customers shopping preferences shift to more digital avenues, retailers are figuring out how to integrate their physical store locations into the digital shopping experience.

It looks like having a “magic mirror” maybe quite possible after all. I for one cannot wait for the dressing room revolution!

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Marketing Technology Careers

New Opportunities in Marketing for Tech Geeks

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Say what?

That’s right, you read correctly. There are new opportunities emerging in marketing that – gasp – are not creative. Yet, I believe these new roles have the ability to contribute to a successful campaign as much as creative ingenuity.

Technology is changing the face of marketing in more ways than just engagement and advertising. It’s bringing to light the need to recruit and hire personnel with technical acumen. Creative skills have always been a crucial part of marketing and will continue to be so. But, as the digital landscape continues to morph and grow, marketers will struggle with delivering content dynamically and quickly without people that possess technical ability. The tools available today (and certainly in the future) are much more sophisticated and integrated than ever before.

Additionally, more and more marketers need to understand the data that is cultivated and stored inside their organization and be able to maximize the value from it. See if this sounds familiar: the marketing department wants to more fully understand customer perception and attitudes. They hire expensive vendors and purchase additional tools capable of collecting this data only to find out that the Customer Service department is already gathering a large portion of this information through their customer information systems. What ends ups happening is the implementation of disparate systems and duplicate customer information. This happens over and over again throughout the corporate world. It is often said that an organization is “data rich, but information poor”. Meaning, most organizations are swimming in data, but what they lack is real integration and analytical insight as to what the data means or how best to use it. Here’s where marketing geeks come to the rescue.

The skills required to integrate marketing campaigns across multiple channels seamlessly and understand the data that is required to be successful are in high demand. One such job is a Marketing Technologist. DigitalPeople’s case study describes the marketing technologist’s primary role is to assure that technology is being used in the most effective manner and that it offers a competitive marketing advantage. They work more closely with business leaders to prioritize IT strategies and make them executable as they relate to key marketing strategies. Companies currently looking for this type of role include Dell, Baptist Healthcare System, and NBC Universal. Scott Brinker states a marketing technologist is a marketer who understands technology and a technologist who is passionate about marketing. A more elevated role is Chief Marketing Technologist, one that is equivalent of the Chief Information Officer. This person reports directly to the Chief Marketing Officer and oversees all things marketing – marketing software, data and analytics, social and mobile platforms, apps development, content marketing, web mechanics, and digital advertising networks.

These new roles and responsibilities open the door for a whole new group of people who may have not given a career in marketing a second thought. But, as the future of marketing becomes more technical, marketing tech jobs are hot!

So, marketers…get your geek on!

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